A Tour of Bogota Through Street Art

The trip to Bogota didn’t quite start off the best. We were delayed in the airport for about 4 hours which cut off one of our days in the city. Never fear, there is always a walking tour that helps show what the city is all about! You can read about my previous trip to Bogota here and here.

Everyone knows how much I love graffiti and so I jumped at the chance to go on the free walking tour again. Even though I went on this tour before, it was completely different since once a piece is on a wall, the artist no longer owns it and streets can change constantly. Of course there are some unwritten rules about respect and covering up pieces but that is neither here nor there at the moment.

The Candelaria area is where most of the street art is and the new mayor is working on covering up all the walls within the next 2 years. He wants to change the area and make it more upscale and not a backpackers area. So if you want to see of the best street artists work, you better get to Bogota soon!

I took so many pictures of many different artists and I don’t have a story or information about all of them. The best part about street art is that it looks different and tells a different story to everyone.

This piece was not even discussed on the tour. It just caught my eye.

DjLu uses real images to inspire his art and always has some sort of political statement to make.

The two pictures above connect to wrap around a corner.

This wall has a “tag resistant” paint on it so that if someone tags it, they can wash off just that part.

This piece was commissioned as part of a Bogota scavenger hunt to help promote the city.

The above 3 pictures are all from a family of artists. On my last tour the park looked different but has gone through a renovation and so all new walls mean all new art.

This building was bought by the government and is going to be high end apartments. The art is a protest against that. 

A new piece by Guache.

This artist was inspired by conversations he overheard as people walked by or the actual people themselves. He just let the piece develop.

Honestly, Bogota is probably my favorite city I have been to in Colombia and I know a lot of people will disagree with me. I just love that it has a pulse and an underlying amazing energy. It also seems much less touristy than the other places I have been in Colombia but there are many more to explore. Perhaps it is just my love of street art that makes me feel this way!

Signal Festival Prague

I love traveling to cities having no idea that a festival or event is even happening. I went to Prague a few years ago (read about it here here and here) and loved it and wanted to go again to cut the traveling time of my trip from Vienna to Berlin. Signal Festival or Festival of Lights happened to start the night before I was leaving and I totally geeked out and went to as many installations as I could in a few hours! There were pretty long lines for each installation so I could only make it to five but obviously I took enough pictures of each one to make up for it.

Brocken 5.1.

The installation Brocken 5.1 is based on a phenomenon called the Brocken Spectre or mountain spectre. This phenomenon appears high in the mountains when a climber stands with his back to the sun and gazes from the ridge into the mist, creating a gigantic shadow of the observer that is surrounded by a rainbow. In this installation the viewer enters an interactive object intersected by 60,000 holes that create the illusion of a flight through a starry sky. Brocken 5.1 also makes reference to the topic of absolute darkness, that is, a commodity that is altogether insufficient in large cities.

Brocken 5.1 was first presented as part of the DEPO2015 project in Plzen and subsequently at the BLIK BLIK 2016 festival. In both cases the installation gained great popularity with viewers. This interactive object is also influenced by daylight, and the installation can therefore be visited and tried out before night falls.

The Japanese artist Yasuhiro Chida originally studied architecture at Musashino Art University. His interests include specific topics such as spatial awareness or change of somatic perception. Part of his creative process involves nature, where he spends much of his time, and which he incorporates into his work. He allows various forces of nature to act upon his installations, such as the movement of the sun across the sky throughout the day.

Voice of Figures

This videomapping by Radugadesign transforms the façade of the Kinský Palace into vivid color. And yet there is more to this performance, which at first glance seems like a cheerful play of basic abstract shapes and saturated colors, than meets the eye. Radugadesign has taken the large volumes of data known in the world of computer technology as “big data” and converted them into a soundtrack. The initial confusion and cacophony of shapes represents the unorganized data the creators of the videomapping have used as their medium, which ultimately come together through the facade of the Kinský Palace into shapes that form a harmonic melody.Thus the patterns and sounds created through this technically challenging process serve as the end product of a range of figures and formulas.

Since its founding in 2007, the Russian media and design studio Radugadesign has managed to carry out an unbelievable 350 projects. As a result, the studio has established a leading position in Russia in the field of entertainment technologies and interactive installations, achieving renown beyond their homeland as well. Radugadesign has been featured, for example, in France, Belgium, Korea, and even at the North Pole. The wide range of their activities includes everything from audiovisual shows to interactive installations, using combinations of their primary specialties – space, technology, and design. They collaborate frequently with a range of experts across creative fields including architects, designers, artists, musicians, and even programmers. The collective efforts of these individuals have created projects that for almost ten years have resonated with audiences throughout the world.


Rezonátor

Rezonátor combines elements of technology with a philosophical subtext, all derived from scientific understanding. As expressed by its title, it consists of a model of a resonator – that is, a fundamental component of the mechanism of a laser module. And yet the artist doesn’t stop at the technical aspects of this device, but also presents the resonator as a metaphor for human existence. In his view, each human being figuratively functions as a sort of sociocultural resonator. During our lives we perceive all possible external influences of society in the same manner as this device. In response to feedback and reactions within us we give forth our own “memetic light,” reacting most frequently in the form of spoken expression.

Czech visual artist Jan Hladil studied graphic design and subsequently supermedia at the Academy of Arts, Architecture, and Design in Prague. During his studies he worked intensively on mastering the entire process of creating video in all of its forms. For several years he has worked as a VJ and has worked on videoinstallations and created content for the audiovisual label Lunchmeat. He has also collaborated, for example, with Laterna Magika on the New Scene at the National Theatre. In his freestyle work he focuses on interpretations of social, cultural, and yet physical processes, converting their specific visual manifestations into an artistic form of understanding. He has presented his audiovisual works at the National Gallery, the DOX Centre for Contemporary Art, the Gallery of the Capital City of Prague, the Chemistry Gallery, and the Zdeněk Sklenář Gallery.



Fantastic Planet

Five otherworldly beings have occupied the planet SIGNAL this year. These giant figures
created by Amanda Parer seem to have just landed on earth, and now explore their
surroundings with silent interest and awe. They curiously touch the ground, timidly observe the activity around them from behind a corner, or roll delightedly across the soft grass. At first glance they appear fearsome, but their viewers soon recognize them for the kindhearted visitors they are.

This monumental installation is inspired by the 1973 Czech/French animated film of the
same name (known in Czech as Divoká planeta). It represents an incomprehensibly remote future in which our planet is settled by giant futuristic beings, where humans are merely wild aborigines no more sophisticated than creatures of the forest.

The work of Australian artist Amanda Parer explores the world of nature in all its vulnerability, as well as the role of humanity within it. In all her works, whether paintings, sculpture, or installations in public spaces, the main role is played by all manner of unconventional beings and wild animals. Enthusiastic audiences the world over have encountered the installations of Amanda Parer at festivals from Sydney to Sweden. While she has already been introduced to neighboring Slovakia through the White Night festival, her work will be presented to the Czech Republic for the first time as part of her Fantastic Planet installation. The SIGNAL Festival therefore serves as the European premiere of this completely new installation.


Monolith powered by Mercedes-Benz

The Monolith installation gives homage to the quiet and the noise of the city at night. This light object absorbs all surrounding light sources and transforms them into an engaging digital show. Through alternating landscapes and environments, the installation evokes the impression of a dynamic ride in Mercedes-Benz brand automobiles, providing its viewers with an original experience of night in the city full of light, energy, and elegance. An integral part of the installation is a hypnotic sound that was created specifically for the Monolith by world famous composer from Bosnia Billain.

This installation is composed of 3,328 LED bulbs. Each of them is an independent point of composition, capable of displaying the entire color spectrum. This technology ranks among the newest trends and is now appearing at SIGNAL for the first time ever.

Hyperbinary is the latest project by Amar Mulabegović, Jan Šíma, and Martin Pošta. This international studio for Experiential Design is devoted to the development and production of light installations and videomappings, as well as concept development and visual presentation for large-scale cultural events.

*All descriptions of the installations are directly from the Signal Festival website

 

The Last Bit of Barcelona

Barcelona really is one of the cities where you could spend a month in and still not experience everything. However, after a few days in the city it was time to move on to the next stop of Valencia.

The downside to staying in a hotel is the lack of a kitchen or anywhere to really cook. My mom and I often get pretty creative to make due with what is in the room to create a masterpiece of culinary decadence!

Of course there is no way I can travel without spotting street art and taking pictures. All of this was located in the Gothic Quarter. We went to this area to visit the Picasso Museum where I realized I preferred his modern work more than his early to blue period work.


Sometimes I forget to take pictures of the people I am traveling with since I am usually caught up with the art and architecture and the selfie! But this part of the trip I am with my parents who can be just as silly as me!

Barcelona was an absolute treat. I was able to spend few days of exploring museums and eating delicious food. We head to Valencia next and then to the island of Mallorca before concluding our Spain travels in Sevilla.